Blogs

New Grisham - ROGUE LAWYER - On Sale Now

 

Order signed copies here.

On the right side of the law. Sort of.


Sebastian Rudd is not your typical street lawyer. He works out of a customized bulletproof van, complete with Wi-Fi, a bar, a small fridge, fine leather chairs, a hidden gun compartment, and a heavily armed driver. He has no firm, no partners, no associates, and only one employee, his driver, who’s also his bodyguard, law clerk, confidant, and golf caddy. He lives alone in a small but extremely safe penthouse apartment, and his primary piece of furniture is a vintage pool table. He drinks small-batch bourbon and carries a gun.

Sebastian defends people other lawyers won’t go near: a drug-addled, tattooed kid rumored to be in a satanic cult, who is accused of molesting and murdering two little girls; a vicious crime lord on death row; a homeowner arrested for shooting at a SWAT team that mistakenly invaded his house. Why these clients? Because he believes everyone is entitled to a fair trial, even if he, Sebastian, has to cheat to secure one. He hates injustice, doesn’t like insurance companies, banks, or big corporations; he distrusts all levels of government and laughs at the justice system’s notions of ethical behavior.

Sebastian Rudd is one of John Grisham’s most colorful, outrageous, and vividly drawn characters yet. Gritty, witty, and impossible to put down, Rogue Lawyer showcases the master of the legal thriller at his very best.

Big Weekend for (Square) Books

                  

 

Beginning tonight, Thursday August 20th and continuting through Sunday, Square Books and Mississippi in general will be celebrating the book. Thursday evening at 5 p.m., we welcome back Sandra Beasley, a former Summer Poet in Residence at Ole Miss with her new book of poetry Count the WavesAll day Saturday at the State Capitol in Jackson, the first inaugural Mississippi Book Festival will be happening, featuring some of the most outstanding writers from the Magnolia State. To wrap up the weekend, former Governor Haley Barbour will be at Off Square Books on Sunday at 2 p.m. to discuss his new book America's Great Storm - the story of Barbour's leadership in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. We hope you will be able to attend one (or all) of these fantastic events happening in our great state this weekend. 

Square Books Dear Reader Now Available

 

The Fall '15 issue of Dear Reader is now on our site, with the printed piece soon in the mail.  The new issue is loaded with exciting upcoming books, including Rogue Lawyer by John Grisham, William Gay's last novel, Little Sister Death, The Art of Memoir by Mary Karr, a new book of early Truman Capote stories, a cookbook from our friends at Garden & Gun, many choices for children, and loads of books whose authors will be here, including Deborah Diesen, Kenneth Oppel, Garth Stein, Joy Williams, Jon Meacham, Paul Theroux, Jonathan Franzen, Sloane Crosley, Ron Rash, Bonnie Jo Campbell, and a proverbial mess of Mississippians: Haley Barbour (soon, Aug. 23!), Elise Winter, John Hailman, Matthew Guinn, Taylor Kitchings, Stuart Stevens, Bruce Levingston, and Neely Tucker.

How did Go Set a Watchman change our notions about Scout, Atticus, and Harper Lee?

Come join us Thursday, August 6th at 5 p.m. at Off Square Books for this special discussion.

The newly published book by Harper Lee has been a subject of controversy for months. Since several days prior to the publication of Go Set a Watchman on July 14, when a few “exclusive” reviews set off a flurry of press articles about the book and its publication – at least nine in the New York Times in the month of July – at least one calling the book “a fraud,” and “one of the epic money grabs in the modern history of American publishing.”  There have been articles about the articles, such as Newsweek’s “How Mad at the New York Times is Harper Lee’s Publisher?”The book sold 1.1 million copies in its first week of publication, and conversations about the book’s legitimacy, or illegitimacy, the people behind its publication, and Harper Lee’s ideas and intentions about both this book and To Kill a Mockingbird continue unabated.   We estimate an average of fifteen such conversations a day that take place here at Square Books, and you’re encouraged to take part or attend our event August 6.This event encourages observations and remarks by members of the audience and will be moderated by Richard Howorth. There will be brief opening remarks by Deborah Barker, Professor, University of Mississippi, whose areas of study include gender, southern film, and women writers of the 19th and 20th centuries and by Laurie Jones, Pastor of Marks Presbyterian Church and native of Monroeville, Alabama, Harper Lee's hometown.

Great success for TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD public reading

     

 

Saturday was a fine, fun day upstairs at Square Books, where, beginning at precisely 9:00 a.m., some sixty-odd readers read without stopping from Harper Lee’s classic, To Kill a Mockingbird, in ten minutes shifts until they had finished at 7:00 p.m.  Who went first?  Susan Robinson.  Why Susan Robinson?  Naturally, because she signed up to go first and drove 550 miles from Oklahoma City just to do so.   Like many others, Susan hung around for much of the day, dropping in from time to time to see what Scout and them are up to now.  You can see pictures of every reader on our Facebook page, with a quote from some part of the passage read  by each reader.  

Many old Mockingbird and Square Books friends, like Ann O’Dell and Eunice Benton, were great readers.   Several were obviously pros, like Alex Mercedes and Ricardo Carroll, who have these great booming or projecting voices, and read flawlessly.   Tom Franklin, reading the passage when the jury’s decision is announced, became a bit emotional, as did we all.  I didn’t get to hear everyone, but I can say that Abigail Meisel, Mary Edith Walker, and Susan Hayman are all terrific readers. One reader got a solid round of applause, young Ze Carroll, who appeared to be about eleven or twelve years old.  His dad stood behind him to help pronounce a few words he probably had never encountered, not to mention the dialog and Southern colloquialisms, but young Ze read marvelously.  Another really fine reader, Bo Wilson, arrived here at 7:30 a.m. and, not counting a lunch break, didn’t leave until we were done, at 7:00 p.m.  

Special thanks to Lyn Roberts, for organizing and supervising, to Norma Barksdale, the same, including the great Mockingbird #tkam excerpts on Facebook, and to all the other readers and to the other booksellers – many of whom became readers at the end, as our estimate for finishing time was a bit short.

Several people suggested this event was so much fun we ought to do it again with some other book.  So we may.  National Public Radio had someone there at 9 a.m. to record several readers – and afterwards, ambush them with questions regarding Atticus Finch’s racism that purportedly reveals itself in Go Set a Watchman, which most of them hadn’t heard about and came from “an exclusive review” from the New York Times’ Michiko Kakutani on July 10, meaning we had only Lord Michiko to believe in for four days.    We agree with the sentiments of Mary Badham, who played Scout in the movie verson of TKAM and was later quoted in the Times (perhaps atoning for Kakutani's earlier alarm), "I wish the press had given the book a chance to be read before it was discussed."   There was a time when the press never preempted a book's publication -- no publisher would allow it, but the internet, perhaps, has changed that.   And one has to reckon an "exclusive" arrangement implies the Times giving something up something of value in return.

The book has been tightly embargoed and we were not allowed to allow other people to read it until Tuesday, July  14.  It’s almost enough to make one run screaming home to watch CNN’s 24-hour “news” cycle of, speaking of racists, Donald Trump’s reality campaign. The Lafayette County – Oxford Library will show the movie version of TKAM tonight, Monday, July 13, beginning at 5:30, and we will open Square Books’ doors on Tuesday at 7:30 a.m., with coffee and donuts, for everyone who has come to get his or her or their copy of Go Set a WatchmanAnd, a related and recent addition to our event schedule:   "How Did Go Set a Watchman Change Our Notions about Scout, Atticus, and Harper Lee?"  -- a discussion forum for readers of Harper Lee's books -- will take place at Off Square Books 5:00 p.m. Thursday, August 6.

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