Spiritual Formation: Following the Movements of the Spirit (Hardcover)

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Staff Reviews



I'm a sucker for anything about the Civil War, but I have never seen a book quite like this. Part biography, part cookbook, Eighmey looks at Lincoln and his relationship with food--the way he used it in his speeches and the way it influenced his life. For every recipe included there is a story to go with it, and the best part is that each recipe has been updated to include readily available ingredients and modern measurements. Celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War in style with this delicious exploration of our 16th President. --Andrew

Russia is an enigmatic place that has undergone momentous changes but here we are, afraid of it again. Feifer explicates the New Russia in the way that Hedrick Smith’s bestselling The Russians did the Soviet Union in 1976. Over eight years he interviewed many ordinary Russians, showing how little has changed, the corruption at all levels of life, and how so few have control of immense fortunes and power at the expense of a beaten-down population. He discusses the Russia that has given the world great literature, music, and dance, but also describes rampant alcoholism and militant religion. A fascinating, lively book. --Lisa

Phil Klay takes his audience to Iraq and back again in this book of short stories reminiscent of Generation Kill. Redeployment is about just that, taking the audience back to the sands of Iraq as he shows these Marines at their most vulnerable, ranging from the only survivor of an IED trying to connect with an actress trying to understand him to a man who has to teach Iraqi children to play baseball to appease his superiors. --Andrew

Lee Lien, has grown up in a refugee family from Vietnam that came to suburban Chicago to make a new life with their noodle shop. Lee has a PhD in English that her hilariously prickly mother thinks is a waste, since Lee has no job and has lost her apartment. Becoming obsessed with an unusual gold pin left in her grandfather’s café in Saigon by an American war correspondent, Lee is convinced it belonged to Rose Wilder Lane, daughter of Laura Ingalls Wilder. Lee embarks on a trip that takes her to archives and Little House sites to solve the mystery. What she discovers is fascinating and so fun. This is a brilliant neo-pioneer story with great characters: a rebel-punk brother and Ong Hai, the wise, Corona-drinking grandfather. --Lisa

This is a brilliant debut story collection full of heart that will leave you wanting more. Poissant is a talented young writer who demostrates the empathy of Richard Ford combined with the rough South of Harry Crews and the quirkiness of Kevin Wilson. But perhaps Karen Russell said it best when she wrote in support of the book: “In these pages you’ll find charming reprobates and self-deluded hustlers, young lovers, alligators and dead dogs, fathers and sons, all the warped love of family, the batshit hilarity of the South and the ‘geometry’ of loss.” Highly recommended. --Cody

Through a careful blend of mystery and magic, Mississippi author Deborah Johnson’s new book tells the story of reaction to a hate crime in the rural South. A decorated black soldier is murdered on the last leg of his trip home from World War II to Mississippi, sparking an investigation involving both his small-town community and the NAACP under Thurgood Marshall. When Marshall’s assistant, Regina, takes a personal interest in the case, she makes her way to the Deep South to try and make sense of the crime. From there, the novel becomes incredibly fast-paced. You won’t be able to stop until you’ve figured out all of the connections and secrets, and all the different meanings of magic.  --Mary Marge

Within days of the appearance here of Elizabeth Spencer, the reigning monarch of Mississippi letters, we will see perhaps her heir apparent in the person of native Mississippian Mary Miller, whose debut novel heralds a confident and credible new voice in American fiction. The Last Days of California is a 21st century coming-of-age, cross-country family car trip with an evangelical, enraptured dad, a stoic mom, and bossy big sister. While this doesn’t sound like the sort of family vacation most of us as fly-on-the-wall readers would like to go on, once you get in this particular car, you can’t get out. You don’t want out, because the story and the writing are that fine. Mary Miller is next year’s John and Renee Grisham writer-in-residence.  --Richard

A stellar book of flash fiction centered around duels - both historical (Burr v Hamilton) and imagined (an alcoholic v the bottle) - each consisting of opposing accounts from the individual duelists followed by a third account provided by a witness. In addition, the pieces are accompanied by wonderful illustrations from artist Tynan Kerr. The result is an inventive, playful, and darkly comical debut by native Mississippian and former Ole Miss student Garriga. --Cody

A decade after the sudden and tragic loss of the poet’s father, we witness the unfolding of his grief. “In the night I brush / my teeth with a razor,” he tells us, in one of the collection’s piercing two-line poems. Young captures the strange silence of bereavement: “Not the storm/ but the calm/ that slays me.” But the poet acknowledges, even celebrates, life’s passages, his loss transformed and tempered in a sequence describing the birth of his son: in “Crowning,” he delivers what is surely one of the most powerful birth poems written by a man, describing “her face/ full of fire, then groaning your face/ out like a flower, blood-bloom,/ crocused into air.” Ending this book of birth and grief, the gorgeous title sequence brings acceptance, asking “What good//are wishes if they aren’t/ used up?” while understanding “How to listen/ to what’s gone.”


Anderson deftly juxtaposes the story of Lawrence and three other young diplomatic adventurers. The result is a fascinating, highly entertaining read which explains how the modern Middle East was created by imperial ambitions and why it is such a source of conflict today. --Cody

What do Richard Pryor, Michael Jackson, Truman Capote, Flannery O'Connor, and I have in common? According to this new book of essays, we're all WHITE GIRLS.

This is THE read of 2013, but don't just believe me. Believe hot shot blurbs from Junot Diaz, John Jeremiah Sullivan, and more. You'll be dying to share after reading, just so you can discuss. 

Can't recommend enough. --Mary Marge

This was my most recent road trip listen so I can tell you first hand -- its everything you want out of an audio book. Enthralling story, characters you care about, summer in an amusement park...truly entertaining. --Teresa

First published in 1965, Stoner is a quiet, but nonetheless powerful novel about a professor in a small college town. Stoic, but not without his passions, Stoner's is the journey of self discovery. When asked in an interview if literature was written to be entertaining: "Absolutely. My God, to read without joy is stupid." --Lyn

In this, Rick Bass's 30th book, the author visits Rwanda to teach a writer's workshop. Through this long essay, he explores the country's brutal (and recent) past, as well as the naivete with which Americans generally approach it. It's gripping, self-aware, and a perfect book to read in one or two sittings. --Mary Marge

Maybe the greatest book ever written on the game and just rereleased in a revised and updated edition. Named one of the "top 100 sports books of all time" by Sports Illustrated. Galeano is probably the best Latin American writer you've never heard of. --Cody

One of the finest books about the elusive nature of the West ever written...  It's a graceful and brutal story of isolated men gone haywire." --Time out New York

This book arguably paved the way for Cormac McCarthy -- gorgeously horrific --

-- A MUST -- --Slade

"Big World gives a full anatomy lesson of the kind of heart that's kick-started by booze, cigarettes, and jukebox songs of regret." --The Believer

A new kind of Southern gothic about whiskey drinking women with no way out. it's sad, and funny, and highly recommended. --Amanda

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March 2014
If the Devil wanted to make a deal with you but it was because he really wasn't such a bad guy and he needed help saving the planet, would you agree? If you're aspiring novelist Billy Ridgeway, of course you would. It's only Lucifer. What could possibly go wrong? Bushnell does a hilariously great job constructing a contemporary tale of moral and spiritual dilemmas, and also expertly describes the ego and nuances of a struggling writer - a whole other kind of demon! -- Liberty Hardy, RiverRun Bookstore, Portsmouth, NH

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March 2014
In 1953, Boy Novak runs away from her home on the Lower East Side of New York and ends up in a small town in Massachusetts. She marries Arturo Whitman, a widower with an adored daughter named Snow, and the three live happily until the birth of Bird, whose dark skin exposes the Whitmans as African-Americans passing for white. Oyeyemi is a stunning talent who examines the disparity in how we perceive ourselves and how we allow others to perceive us. Boy, Snow, Bird is a bewitching and beguiling tale with unforgettable characters. -- Amanda Hurley, Inkwood Books, Tampa, FL

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March 2014
In a whirlwind of short stories, Klay gives us a good, strong impression of how it must feel to be an American soldier in the 21st century. The whole gamut of emotions including guilt, worry, post-traumatic stress disorder, and the difficulties associated with homecoming, are presented as real life events. Sometimes chilling to the bone, sometimes heartbreaking, every story has its own value and will touch your heart. -- Jean-Paul Adriaansen, Water Street Books, Exeter, NH

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February 2014
A young lawyer who is sent by Thurgood Marshall to Mississippi in 1946 to investigate the murder of a black soldier encounters a world both surreal and mysterious. Regina Robichard learns that the Jim Crow South is a world unto itself, but she also learns the power of narrative and story as she meets a reclusive author who produced the book that influenced her childhood. This is a novel of subtlety, incisive portraits, and a brilliant evocation of a time and place on the cusp of momentous change. -- Bill Cusumano, Nicola's Books, Ann Arbor, MI

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February 2014
Two sisters bicker with one another over the space in a car's backseat, gas station snack choices, motel room beds, and boys, of course. Only this isn't another angst-ridden coming-of-age road trip novel. This family is driving from Georgia to California so its members can witness the Rapture as it rolls through the world's time zones and arrives, at blessed last, in Pacific Standard Time. A swift, quirky, earnest read that will resonate with anyone who's ever been to a church sleepover, proselytized, or just been a teenager. -- Stacie M. Williams, Boswell Book Company, Milwaukee, WI

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January 2014
Memory doesn't move in a straight line. It is chaotic, digressive, and imperfect. While most memoirs force life into the restrictions of straight lines, Nelson embraces the chaos by moving back and forth in time, free-associating among memories and organizing her life into a series of essays. What could be just another memoir of a family disintegrated by substance abuse becomes a vibrant and challenging exploration of abuse, obsession, coping, family, friendship, and self-discovery. -- Josh Cook, Porter Square Books, Cambridge, MA

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January 2014
Treat yourself to this delightful French tale -- with a bit of bawdiness -- of family, friendship, and quirky misdirection. Readers are transported from high society Paris to medieval academia to a Kenyan crocodile farm. It is easy to see why Pancol is a bestselling author whose books have been translated into 30 languages! -- Sally Van Wert, MacDonald Book Shop, Estes Park, CO

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December 2013
A seemingly unassuming little novel with a huge heart, Stop Here captures you from page one. Gologorsky, the author of The Things We Do to Make It Home, once again expertly portrays the impact of war on the lives of working class families. I got so involved in the lives of the characters working at Murray's Diner that when my basset hound chewed up the last 25 pages of the manuscript, I had to call my sales rep to get another copy ASAP! -- Flossie McNabb, Union Avenue Books, Knoxville, TN

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December 2013
I've been reading Jim Harrison since I was 16 years old and always look forward to another of his books. Brown Dog is an especially big treat since it brings together five previously published novellas as well as a sixth one never before published entitled, 'He Dog.' Reading all of the novellas, one realizes that the portrait of the travails of Brown Dog is one of the greatest literary journeys of our time. -- Cody Morrison, Square Books, Oxford, MS

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December 2013
Everyone knows that princesses are lovely beings who live fairy-tale lives. Unless, of course, they are real people. Then it's a bit messier. McRobbie has written a fascinating account of real princesses who didn't live happily ever after. Starting in antiquity, she describes the legend that has surrounded each princess, and then attempts to ascertain the truth of what the princess was really like and the reality of her situation. This book is a though-provoking addition to feminist literature. -- Janice Hunsche, Kaleidosaurus Books, Fishers, IN

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December 2013
Blanco's book is truly for all of us. His heartwarming memoir -- complete with humility, awe, joy, and hope -- allows readers an intimate peek into his world to share one man's realization of his American Dream. The three poems Blanco wrote for consideration by the 2013 Presidential Inaugural Committee are accessible to even the most lay readers of poetry. This is a book to read and re-read, and to share with family and friends. A lovely gift, it both aspires and affirms. -- Dawn Rennert, The Concord Bookshop, Concord, MA

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December 2013
The tastes of new places -- from the sublime to the ridiculous -- are the ingredients of these essays. Writers as varied as Padma Lakshmi and Frances Mayes consider a pivotal meal or taste that simultaneously brings a place and a moment to vivid life and makes it live forever in memory. With tales about fishheads and Twinkies and dishes more exotic still, these essays will stir wonderful personal memories for every reader. Bon appetit! -- Michael Barnard, Rakestraw Books, Danville, CA

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December 2013
Sampsell's This Is Between Us is a tangible, breathtaking work of writing. This is a love letter laced with hope, pain, doubt, intoxication, apprehension, and a veritable ocean of feeling, navigated with impeccable skill and grace. Wonderful! -- Jim Brimble, Third Place Books, Lake Forest Park, WA

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November 2013
With photos, facsimiles, and full texts, this volume of correspondence between playwright and actor Shepard and his former father-in-law and close friend, Dark, is as multifaceted as the voices and lives of its principals. Since Shepard has said he won't write a memoir, this spirited 40-plus year correspondence may well be the closest we will get to the playwright's perspective on his own life and work. It is fitting that this insight comes in the form of an adventurous and frank dialogue with another man; like many of Shepard's plays, the complex relationship between two men is at the heart of this collection. Similarly apt is the book's title, which the editor took from a play Shepard and Dark wrote together but that, like their long friendship, remains unfinished. -- Laurie Greer, Politics & Prose Books and Coffee Shop, Washington, DC

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November 2013
What if women ruled the world? In his futuristic thriller, Petrocelli answers that question with a 2082 scenario involving governments run by women worldwide that are threatened by a male-ruled movement named Patria. Julia, the head of security, is worried about the increasing threats even as she is assaulted by memories of violence in her own past. The social and environmental currents that created the future Petrocelli posits, both for good and ill, are all too probable in a book with an intriguing premise and a wonderful cast of strong and head-strong women. -- Betsy Burton, The King's English, Salt Lake City, UT

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September 2013
Stunning! Riveting! Like far-off black clouds with the faint sound of thunder on the horizon, Let Him Go crescendos into a violent northern Plains thunderstorm as grandparents George and Margaret Blackledge set out on a journey to -- Nancy Simpson-Brice, The Book Vault, Oskaloosa, IA

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September 2013
Alone and restless one evening, Daniel Mercier is dining at a Parisian Brasserie when Francois Mitterand, the President of France, is seated at the next table. Mitterand and his friends eat, talk of world affairs, and finally depart, but Mitterand has left his hat behind. The dazed Mercier promptly dons said hat and the next day at work he finds himself unaccountably voluble, as if under a spell. The result of his eloquence and his newly stiffened spine is a promotion which he feels he owes to his new and talismanic hat. When he inadvertently leaves that hat on a train, it falls into the hands of. To say more would be telling too much. But don't miss this charming French confection of a novel that is irresistibly whimsical, possessed of wit somewhere between that of Alan Bennett's The Uncommon Reader and Muriel Barbery's The Elegance of the Hedgehog. -- Betsy Burton, The King's English, Salt Lake City, UT

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September 2013
Guidance through conversation is a key theme of this book. Just expecting your child or teen to make a good decision is really not enough. But talking about ethics and morals can help give children and teens a foundation to start building his or her ethical pathway through life. Open one of the questions Parker proposes and see whee the conversation takes your family. This book seems like a great resource for parents to carry around for conversations not only at the dinner table, but on the commute to school and waiting for sports events to begin. I think it will also be a great resource to look at from time to find a fiction book for family reading that tackles one or more of the issues Parker presents. Parents, Guidance Counselors, and teachers have a new place to turn for ideas when they are trying to guide children and students through the maze of decision making about life's situations small and big. -- Connie Griffin, Bookworks, Albuquerque, NM

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August 2013
The quest of a young girl and her uncle becomes an odyssey through a century and takes the reader on a literary voyage unlike any in recent memory. The saga of the Rathbone whaling family will bring echoes of Melville's own tale of obsession in a novel reminiscent of the great, sprawling moralistic books of the 19th century. This is storytelling at its finest. -- Bill Cusumano, Nicola's Books, Ann Arbor, MI

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August 2013
The second book in The Last Policeman trilogy, Countdown City turns darker as the destruction of the world gets closer. Life has come to a halt as everyone prepares for the last days and vital services such as electricity and water are no longer available. Hank Palace is an out of work policeman who continues to believe that helping people is part of who he is, so when an old friend asks for his help in locating her missing husband, he agrees, knowing that many have gone missing and his search may be meaningless. Even he is stumped when asked why he continues to look, saying only that he was asked to. As sides are drawn in preparation for the coming battles over resources and survival, Hank follows the clues and finds his quarry with surprising results. He is helped along the way by his rebel sister who maybe on to a way to save the world. Part conventional mystery and part extistential problem - what would you do if you knew exactly when the end of the world was coming - this book entertains and elicits thought. Start with the first - The Last Policeman, continue with the Countdown City and hold your breath waiting for the last in the series. -- Ann Carlson, Harborwalk Books, Georgetown, SC

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August 2013
The great thing about Nora, the titular 'thinking woman' is that she is completely relatable. Nora, a perennial graduate student who hasn't made the best romantic choices, lands in another world that is rife with medieval attitudes toward women. She brings an analytical eye to a highly stratified, low-tech, but magical world and by speaking truth to power she learns new lessons about herself. This beautifully written first novel reverberates with echoes of fairy tales and fantasy literature from Narnia to Harry Potter. -- Tonie Lilley, The Regulator Bookshop, Durham, NC

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August 2013
Charlie McCarthy has always been different. For the inhabitants of Ballyronan, a tiny Irish village, Charlie is the Gamal, the village idiot, the fool. But Charlie observes and has an incredible memory. And when something terrible happens to his best friends, James and Sinead, Charlie goes into shock. As a cathartic exercise, his doctor asks him to write his version of the events. Sometimes funny, sometimes moving, Charlie's testimony jumps from the present to the past and back again, wanders and gets lost, reflecting Charlie's confused and troubled mind. The Gamal is a highly original and heartbreaking story with an unforgettable narrator whose voice is like no other. -- Pierre Camy, Schuler Books & Music, Grand Rapids, MI

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July 2013
Flunking out of law school was probably the best thing that happened to Fina Ludlow. Ludlow and Associates' most interesting work was not being done by their lawyers but by their lead investigator, Frank Gillis. So Fina learns her trade from Frank, taking over his role when he leaves the firm. Private investigation is an ideal fit for Fina: she can keep her own hours, roam the streets, and carry a gun. Discreet and devious, her favorite combination, gets her through a lot of doors, that and her skill with a lock pick. Fina's family loyalty was strong but even family can stretch the rules as well as the law. When her sister-in-law goes missing and her niece locks her bedroom door at night Fina has to decide which side she is on: family loyalty or the truth. Don't miss this debut novel by an author who actually has a degree in private investigation. Thoft has created a female detective who is tough, fair-minded, determined and possessing a biting sense of humor. Hopefully, Loyalty is the beginning of a gripping new series. -- Karen Briggs, Great Northern Books and Hobbies, Oscoda, MI

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May 2013
Drawing on the historical journals of her grandfather, author Virginia Pye has created something that is rather unique these days: a totally original story line. Her debut novel tells the story of Reverend Wesley Watson and his wife Grace as they confront the bleak landscape of northwestern China shortly after the Boxer Rebellion. Intending to bring the word of God to the Chinese, they are immediately sidetracked by the kidnapping of their young son. What follows is the heart-wrenching tale of the search for their son, ultimately leading to the Reverend's downfall and Grace's debilitating illness. Pye's sharp, haunting descriptions of drought, famine, desert travel, and opium dens will immerse readers in this world. RIVER OF DUST is a must-read for fans of quality historical fiction. -- Nancy Simpson Brice, The Book Vault, Oskaloosa, IA

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February 2013
This is a wild ride of a book, ever so loosely based on The Wizard of Oz but set in contemporary suburbia. There's a fast-food phone-sex operator, a janitor/KISS cover band Rock’n’Roller, a former football warrior known as Reasons With Fists, and a magician/marriage counselor all both helping and deterring the hero's desire to get back home. A story totally engaging and surprisingly wise in the end. -- Alena Deerwater, Gallery Bookshop & Bookwinkle's Children's Books, Mendocino, CA

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January 2013
Heartbreaking, breathtaking, and very human, The Colour of Milk reads less like historical fiction and more like a memoir. Mary is a hardworking but willful farm girl in rural England until her abusive father 'sells' her to the local vicar as a servant. Her new position brings her opportunities for education and wider knowledge than she ever had before, but there are consequences. This gripping story of power, family, and self-determination will pull you right in and stay with you for a long time. -- Caitlin Caulfield, Odyssey Bookshop, South Hadley, MA

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December 2012
Sheriff Bittersmith is called to investigate a violent crime, but it's his last day in power and he wants to take his anger out on someone. There were no witnesses to the killing, but the victim's daughter and the hired man have vanished into the impending snow storm. Handyman Gale G'wain is innocent of the murder and other crimes the sheriff's bitter mind has ascribed to him, but he knows that he will never be given the chance to tell his story. Weak, wounded and holed up in an unoccupied farmhouse, Gale loads the guns he finds there and gets ready to defend himself. Lindemuth's story raises many questions about law, justice, and the difference between the two. -- Keri Rojas, Cornerstone Cottage Kids, Hampton, IA

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December 2012
The impact of Constantine on Western civilization cannot be emphasized enough, yet the Roman emperor is mostly a creature of myth and legend. Potter brings this powerful, world-changing figure to life in a biography that gives true meaning to the man whose actions established Christianity in Europe. Examining the politics and conflicts of the late empire, Potter gives the reader an understanding of the forces that eventually led to a major religious and philosophical change. -- Bill Cusumano, Nicola's Books, Ann Arbor, MI

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August 2012
Sandra Brannan keeps improving with each Liv Bergen novel. While not as gruesome as the first two in the series, this installment is a true mystery. Brannan's characters are becoming richer in each new installment. Wonderfully drawn, Liv holds you in thrall, and you can't wait to see what happens to her next. Just see if you can figure out the killer in this 'more than a whodunit.' -- Jo Gilley, Blue Ridge Booksellers and Cafe, Waynesville, NC

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July 2012
If Quentin Tarantino and Cormac McCarthy crossed paths in a rundown whiskey bar just north of the Rio Grande, this is the book that connection would produce. It's a novel wrapped in a mystery and dipped in autobiography with a dash of investigative journalism about Jones' return to his hometown and the unintended consequences of a fire form his childhood that ripped the community apart. The story of truth being brought to light and ancient skeletons finally being given their proper burial, this remarkable novelized memoir will stay with you. -- Matt Falvey, Next Chapter Bookshop, Mequon, WI

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May 2012
Bechard tells the story of his extraordinary upbringing in British Columbia, where he was strongly influenced by a father who enjoyed cheating death by doing everything from racing trains at railroad crossings to fighting anyone who crossed him. The even wilder deeds of his father's past could not be kept secret, and as they were slowly revealed, this loving and bizarre dad shaped the life of his son. Bechard has done a masterful job of taking all that life has dealt him and accepting and analyzing it in a fascinating piece of literature. I found myself alternating between cringing and laughing at each page. -- Peter Schertz, Maria's Bookshop, Durango, CO

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February 2012
Mallory has been one of my favorite series characters since I first encountered her in Mallory's Oracle many years ago. It is hard to feel sympathy for her because she doesn't need any, but this story of a damaged woman trying to help a damaged child is very moving. The crimes are solved in Mallory's unique outside-the-box method, and, as always, justice is all that matters to her. I look forward to handselling this book and introducing more readers to Mallory. -- Ann Carlson, Harborwalk Books, Georgetown, SC

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January 2012
It's not just that there's a Seattle lurking, both familiar and eerily altered, in Boudinot's joltingly intense new novel set in a not-so-distant future; it's also that the people who inhabit Blueprints of the Afterlife take as given this strange new world. They give it battle, still going at life in full-tilted measure as much as anyone ever could - even if it means sometimes facing the clone of someone who is known or loved. This is a brave, daring, entrancing book, one that elicits empathy for the characters in it, even as it makes you look at the real world around you with different, startled eyes. -- Rick Simonson, The Elliott Bay Book Company, Seattle, WA

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December 2011
In Carl Barks' Duckburg we see all the human frailties: Donald Duck's anger, Scrooge's ambition, the Beagle Boys' greed. Barks was a virtuoso artist and writer who combined breakneck action with detailed and subtle art. You will find a master at his peak in 'Lost in the Andes,' and your inner-child will thank you. -- Eric Schultheis, Books Inc., Berkeley, CA

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September 2011
This is a brilliant first novel about a teacher at an international high school in Paris and his relationships with, and influence on, his students and colleagues. The story is told by several narrators whose distinct voices contribute to the depth of the conflict between idealism and reality, each vividly presented in these seductive pages. I couldn't put it down. -- Lanetta Parks, The Compleat Bookseller, Chestertown, MD

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December 2010
Reading this book, I can only think of the many people I want to share it with: my friend whose husband is dying, my granddaughter going off to a new school, and a staff member moving out of her big house into an apartment. Change encourages any reader to be flexible, to look for new directions and not get stuck in the 'old skin.' -- Shirley Mullin, Kids Ink, Indianapolis, IN

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August 2010
The Christmas bonfire, a communal effort held in the church courtyard, is the scene of an annual homecoming party in an Albanian-speaking village in Calabria. For Tullio, a victim of the crushing poverty of Southern Italy who is forced to seek work as a manual laborer in France where he leads an isolated life most of the year, it is a time to renew social ties with village friends and family, and to resume his paternal responsibilities. The bonfire is where Tullio and his son Marco tell their tales, share sorrows and frustrations, and cast off painful memories of the long absences. This Christmas, to mark Marco's passage to manhood, will be different. -- Darwin Ellis, Books on the Common, Ridgefield, CT

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June 2010
This is an interesting journey across small towns of heartland America which are named for places out of Greek Mythology. The author is looking for meaning in his life. What he finds is as true today in the towns named like the Greek originals as it was in the original Greek towns. Heroes are everywhere if you just look for them. He searches and finds his own heroic story along the way. -- Catherine Carpenter, Cate's Books and Stuff, Louisiana, MO

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March 2010
Join media escort Jack Hercules Sheahan in a wicked romp through Iowa City as he escorts pretentious writers, spends an evening in jail, and battles writers block. A must for any student of fiction, or for that matter, any reader. -- Zach Sampinos, Sam Weller's Books, Salt Lake City, UT

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December 2009
On rare occasions, a book can have a visceral impact on a readers, and that's the case with Wherever I Lie Is Your Bed, a beautiful anthology of world literature in translation. Every translation in this volume is a gem, every piece its own little bit of light on a culture and a language. -- Cathy Langer, Tattered Cover Bookstore, Denver, CO

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December 2009
Those of us who approach the holidays with more trepidation than glee finally have a holiday book to call our own! Humor writers both classic (Robert Benchley, Corey Ford, James Thurber) and contemporary (David Sedaris, Augusten Burroughs, Dave Barry, Jonathan Ames) weigh in on the dark side of the holidays. -- Carol Schneck, Schuler Books & Music, Okemos, MI

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December 2009
It is easy for me to recommend My Bread because I have been using Jim Lahey's recipe for no-knead bread ever since the flawlessly simple and versatile recipe was published in the New York Times. My Bread includes more than 40 bread variations, recipes for sandwich ingredients, recipes for his classic panini, and suggestions for what to do with left over stale bread. This is the bread book to end all bread books. -- Janina Larenas, Logos Books & Records, Santa Cruz, CA

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November 2009
Beloved on the Earth is the best book on the subject that I've come across. Beautiful pieces from May Sarton, Rilke, Mary Jo Bang, and Jane Kenyon are included, but you will make many other discoveries, too. Full of warming and wise poems, this is a collection that will help readers find comfort and solace. -- Linda Grana, Lafayette Book Store, Lafayette, CA

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November 2009
Soul of Wood is a careening, delirious, madcap tour through the rattled soul of mid-20th century Europe. The book's greatest achievement is the titular novella in which a disabled veteran fights for survival in the absurdist inferno of Austria under the Third Reich, where, finally, a handful of megalomaniacs compete to take possession of a sort of miraculous young Jew. -- Adam Walter, Third Place Books, Lake Forest Park, WA

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October 2009
I?ve long been a fan of Coleman's Moe Prager series, and I have admired Bruen's writing for the spare, almost poetic prose he creates. They have written a small, intimate book with a limited cast and a compact, explosive plot?and it is seamless. It is also gritty, with sharply drawn characters and an unstoppable pace. More, please. -- Linda Brown, The Mystery Book Store, Los Angeles, CA

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October 2009
Logicomix presents the complex life of legendary philosopher Bertrand Russell as an easy-to-understand graphic novel rich with details and ideas. This compelling book is both a fantastic historical take on the foundation of modern logic and a penetrating look into one of the 20th century's brightest minds. -- Jerry Fieldsted, Windows on the World-Books & Art, Mariposa, CA

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September 2009
Andie Ryan's descriptions of the violence (and the passion) revolving around the meltdown-from-within of a respected securities firm is filled with vividly drawn characters and surprises on every page. -- Randy Smith, Destinations Booksellers, New Albany, IN

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June 2009
Mississippi wheeler-dealer Neil White, after years of snowballing financial deals and deceptions, finds himself assigned to a year in a Federal correction facility in Carville, Louisiana, home to the last people in the continental U.S. with Hansen's Disease -- better known as leprosy. From the unlikely combination of inmates and patients, White struggles to discover new values and to understand a little-known world. -- Carolyn Chesser, Bayou Book Company, Niceville, FL

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May 2009
John Hart has written a thriller about a young boy searching for his missing twin that will have you on edge and pulling for the hero from the very beginning. The strong characters and twists in the plot had me white-knuckled until I turned the final page. -- Marc Galvin, The Bookstore Plus, Lake Placid, NY

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May 2009
Our favorite, home-spun memoirist is back with his heartfelt, moving, and always hilarious recollections of his new life on 'the farm,' with a brand-new baby, and, of course, his long-awaited coop of chickens. A delight. -- Diane Gressman, Books & Company, Oconomowoc, WI

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May 2009
Segregated Revere, Mississippi, in the 1960s is struggling with the idea and reality of integration when a poor white man injured in a hunting accident is brought into the segregated Doctors Hospital. Deborah Johnson's novel is an engrossing story full of mysterious and interesting characters whom you will identify with and think about long after you have finished the book. A perfect, absorbing read. -- Lillian Kinsey, Bohannons' Books With a Past, Georgetown, KY

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April 2009
What begins as a Mediterranean noir quickly shifts into a puzzle from Pirandello and Calvino country, as the author begins removing sequences from the story and rewriting others. A profound meditation on political beliefs and mortality, with plenty of surprises. -- Nick DiMartino, University Book Store, Seattle, WA

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April 2009
One of the best New Orleans novels I've ever read, Louis Maistros' debut seems dictated in a fever dream of automatic writing. Beginning in 1891, the confrontation between nine-year-old Typhus Morningstar and an evil spirit who has taken possession of a baby will take readers into an underworld journey as a decades-old voodoo curse is unleashed. -- Patrick Millikin, The Poisoned Pen, Scottsdale, AZ

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April 2009
The savage struggle for land and dominion between Native American tribes and Western settlers is brought to life in this riveting novel set in North Texas after the Civil War. Rich in historical background and told in beautiful prose, this is a great novel for book groups. -- Sheila Daley, Barrett Bookstore, Darien, CT

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March 2009
This international mystery beautifully depicts the sights, smells, and sounds of both the historical and modern-day Gaza Strip. The conflicts of the UN, Israelis, and Palestinians are descriptive, bold, and humane -- a truly wonderful read by a literary storyteller from the Mideast! -- Kathleen Dixon, Islandtime Books & More, Washington Island, WI

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January 2009
Since I can't get landscape and garden designer Julie Moir Messervy to come overhaul my house, this great guide is the next best thing. -- Diana Portwood, Bob's Beach Books, Lincoln City, OR

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December 2008
Matt Royal, an ex-cop and retired lawyer, discovers in a bird sanctuary a dead body that will eventually be a clue in the case of his ex-wife's missing stepdaughter. I really enjoyed Blood Island and will be definitely recommending it. -- Andra Tracy, Out Word Bound, Indianapolis, IN

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December 2008
Dave Thompson has written a book for anyone who can remember being excited by an entire album and its artwork. Thompson is truly volcanic in his unadulterated contempt for modern pop/rock and goes to enormous and hilarious pains to explain why the classic rock of the late '60s - '70s is the Holy Grail of rock music. -- Amjad Saleh Faur, Nightbird Books, Fayetteville, AR

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December 2008
David Francis has created a flashback to 1980s Communist Russia filled with suspense, intrigue, and a good deal of sexiness. Stray Dog Winter is a novel of breathless moments, passion, politics, and atmosphere so thick you can feel the cold. -- Calvin Crosby, Books Inc., San Francisco, CA

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December 2008
The Better World Shopping Guide is an important little book that calls for changes in all our shopping habits. The book rates American companies based on 15 years' research of their records on the environment, human rights, community involvement, and other criteria. I'll soon be switching my credit card company, just one of the many changes I'll make to be a more responsible consumer. -- Nancy, Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh, NC

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November 2008
Lynda Barry gives us a volume that is an editorial miracle. The whimsical, the malicious, the heartbreaking, the surreal, the hilarious -- all the work included testifies to the vibrancy of the contemporary comic form. This is a collection to convert the remaining unbelievers and to excite the connoisseurs. -- Josh Cook, Porter Square Books, Cambridge, MA

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August 2008
In this arresting novel about marriage, parenting, working, and finding balance, Perri Klass tells the story of Lucy Weiss, a pediatrician working in a clinic that serves families who are just barely getting by. The novel is strong, real, poignant and, often, funny. -- Betsey Detwiler, Buttonwood Books & Toys, Cohasset, MA

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August 2008
Never has a voice been so original as Awesome in Pendarvis' magnificent modern fairy tale. Take one part Chuck Palahniuk, one part Hans Christian Andersen, one part Stephen Hawking, and you may come close to getting it right. Laughing so hard never felt so good! -- Katie Glasgow, Mitchell Books, Fort Wayne, IN

Description


Henri Nouwen, the world-renowned spiritual guide and counselor, understood the spiritual life as a journey of faith and transformation that is deepened by accountability, community, and relationships. Though he counseled many people during his lifetime, his principles of spiritual formation were never written down. Now, Michael Christensen, one of Nouwen's longtime students, and Rebecca Laird have taken his famous course in spiritual formation and supplemented it with his unpublished writings to create the definitive series on Nouwen's thoughts on the Christian life.

The first book in the series, Spiritual Direction, introduced readers to Nouwen's core concepts and how to live the questions of the spiritual life. Now Spiritual Formation reveals Nouwen's sage advice on how to live out the five classical stages of spiritual development. Featuring a unique visio divina to help guide and focus prayer, this volume reveals Nouwen's unparalleled wisdom on how to move from the mind to the heart and live there in the center—the place where God dwells.

About the Author


Henri J. M. Nouwen (1932-1996) is the author of Reaching Out, The Wounded Healer, Making All Things New, and many other spiritual classics. He taught psychology and pastoral theology at Notre Dame, Yale, and Harvard universities before becoming senior pastor of L'Arche Daybreak in Toronto, Canada, a community where men and women with intellectual disabilities and their assistants create a home for one another.

Praise for Spiritual Formation: Following the Movements of the Spirit…


“The rich lode of material in this book will appeal to individuals on a spiritual journey as well as to those who want to share their experiences of descending from the mind to the heart where all true wisdom resides.”
-Spirituality and Practice

Product Details ISBN-10: 0061686123
ISBN-13: 9780061686122
Published: HarperOne, 07/01/2010
Pages: 192
Language: English