The End of the Cold War: 1985-1991 (Hardcover)

Staff Pick Logo
The End of the Cold War: 1985-1991 Cover Image
$35.00
Hard to Find

Staff Reviews


The Cold War is now consigned to history but many generations can still remember a time when the threat of nuclear war was considerable and there was always the possibility of a true Armageddon. Robert Service has drawn on the astonishing documentation that has become available since the fall of the Soviet Union to present a taut account of how the efforts of statesmen on both sides were able to finally consign the total nuclear threat to oblivion.

— Bill

The Cold War is now consigned to history but many generations can still remember a time when the threat of nuclear war was considerable and there was always the possibility of a true Armageddon. Robert Service has drawn on the astonishing documentation that has become available since the fall of the Soviet Union to present a taut account of how the efforts of statesmen on both sides were able to finally consign the total nuclear threat to oblivion.

— From Bill

Description


On 26 December, 1991, the hammer-and-sickle flag was lowered over the Kremlin for the last time. Yet, just six years earlier, when Mikhail Gorbachev became general secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union and chose Eduard Shevardnadze as his foreign minister, the Cold War seemed like a permanent fixture in world politics. Until its denouement, no Western or Soviet politician foresaw that the standoff between the two superpowers--after decades of struggle over every aspect of security, politics, economics, and ideas--would end within the lifetime of the current generation. Nor was it at all obvious that that the Soviet political leadership would undertake a huge internal reform of the USSR, or that the threat of a nuclear Armageddon could or would be peacefully wound down.

Drawing on pioneering archival research, Robert Service's gripping investigation of the final years of the Cold War pinpoints the extraordinary relationships between Ronald Reagan, Gorbachev, George Shultz, and Shevardnadze, who found ways to cooperate during times of exceptional change around the world. A story of American pressure and Soviet long-term decline and overstretch, The End of the Cold War: 1985-1991 shows how a small but skillful group of statesmen grew determined to end the Cold War on their watch and transformed the global political landscape irreversibly.

About the Author


Robert Service is a British historian, academic, and author who has written extensively on the history of Soviet Russia, particularly the era from the October Revolution to Stalin's death. Service is the author of twelve books, including Spies and Commissars; the acclaimed Lenin: A Biography; Stalin: A Biography; and Comrades: A History of World Communism. He is currently a professor of Russian history at the University of Oxford, a Fellow of St. Antony's College, Oxford, and a senior fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution.
Product Details
ISBN: 9781610394994
ISBN-10: 1610394992
Publisher: PublicAffairs
Publication Date: November 10th, 2015
Pages: 688
Language: English